Previously featured exhibits at the Abbe Museum

 

2016 Waponahki Student Art Show

May through December 2016

The Waponahki Student Art Show, now in its 15th year, brings together a wonderful variety of art created by Passamaquoddy, Penobscot, Maliseet, and Micmac students from early childhood education through high school. The styles, media, and images vary throughout the exhibition, but place, culture, and identity have a strong presence in these original works.

A collaboration of Maine Indian Education and the Abbe Museum.

Special thanks to K.A. McDonald Custom Picture Framing, Bar Harbor.

 

Kluskap of the Wabanaki

2015

According to Wabanaki oral histories, Kluskap–or Koluskap, Gluskap, Glooskap, and Gluskabe–made the world habitable for human beings and taught people to live wisely. Kluskap stories have been told and retold over many generations, and these legends have always been known to teach lessons of values and the characteristics of the animals and Mother Earth. Kluskap was a positive force with all Wabanaki tribes and people from all the communities have written and illustrated many versions of the Kluskap legends. Through original paintings by Maliseet artist Dozay, Kluskap of the Wabanaki illustrates the various legends of Kluskap and his adventures across the Wabanaki homeland, using landmarks that tell his story. This was Dozay's first show in the U.S.

 

2015 Waponahki Student Art Show

A collaboration of Maine Indian Education and the Abbe Museum.

The Waponahki Student Art Show brings together a wonderful variety of art created by Passamaquoddy and Penobscot students from early childhood education through high school. Using a wide array of media, these young artists incorporate traditional beliefs and values with the modern, multi-cultural world around them.

Special thanks to K.A. McDonald Custom Picture Framing, Bar Harbor and The Craft Barn, Ellsworth.

 

Layers of Time: Archaeology at the Abbe Museum

2003-2015

How did people live in the past? What can we know about their lives and history from the archaeological record?

This exhibit followed archaeological research conducted by the Abbe Museum starting in 1928, and considered how excavations at various sites have tried to answer these questions. Through a combination of artifacts, images and text, you were able to explore the questions that were asked and what we have learned during eight decades of archaeological investigations. Layers of Time also featured a variety of hands-on, interactive activities for children and families, letting visitors step into the role of the archaeologist to ask and answer intriguing questions. Learn More >

 

Twisted Path III: Questions of Balance

2014

Twisted Path III: Questions of Balance invited audiences to consider Native American concerns about the environment through the medium of contemporary art. Artists’ works expressed emotional and cultural reflections on the status of our planet - both comfort from a sense of place and connections to the land, and the conflicts inherent in cultural genocide and pollution of sacred spaces.

Invited artists included Gina Brooks, Gabriel Frey, Nicholas Galanin, Shan Goshorn, Vera Longtoe Sheehan, Patricia Michaels, Shane Perley-Dutcher, and guest curator and artist Rick Hunt.

Learn more about the exhibit and the artists >

This is exhibit was made possible thanks to support from:

Sharpe Family Foundation/Douglas and Ann Sharpe

Anonymous Foundation

Fisher Charitable Foundation

Hattie A. & Fred C. Lynam Trust

Lead Corporate Sponsor:

The First

with additional support from:

Maine Arts Commission

Bar Harbor Bank & Trust

Maine Public Broadcasting Network

Bangor Daily News

Funded in part by a grant from the Maine Arts Commission, an independent state agency supported by the National Endowment for the Arts.

 

Wabanaki Guides

2013

Wabanaki Guides focused on the legacy of Wabanaki people serving as guides for European and American explorers, cartographers, tourists and artists from the 1600s to the present. Visitors were invited along for a simulated canoe ride down a Maine river. The journey shined a spotlight on ways in which Wabanaki knowledge of land and waterways influenced Maine’s early visitors and illustrated how this legacy is linked to the modern-day tribes, tourism, and environmental sustainability in Maine.

Visitors “climbed into a canoe with their guide” and began their journey. Along the way, they stopped at “portages” on the river bank. At each portage, visitors learned about the various things a guide needs to consider when planning a trip and what one might expect to encounter along the way. The exhibit focused on the following themes: mapping, tracking, tourism, and economics. Stories and historic accounts from various view points were weaved throughout the exhibit, incorporating the voices of Wabanaki guides both past and present as well as explorers, artists, and cartographers such as Henry David Thoreau and Joseph Treat.

 

Indians & Rusticators: Wabanakis & Summer Visitors on Mt. Desert Island 1840s-1920s

2011- 2012

Winner of a 2012 Leadership in History Award

Indians and Rusticators: Wabanakis and Summer Visitors on Mount Desert Island 1840s-1920s highlighted the role that Mount Desert Island played in the cultural and economic survival of Wabanakis (the collective name for Maliseet, Micmac, Passamaquoddy and Penobscot Indians). Offering a focused look at the seasonal interactions of Wabanakis and summer rusticators (summer residents from the large urban areas of the Northeast), it profiled various personalities, especially the iconic Penobscot Indian showman Frank “Big Thunder” Loring, whose unforgettable presence on Mount Desert Island spanned 60 years of the Rusticator Era. The stories told and research presented was the work of Bunny McBride, MA, and Dr. Harald Prins, highly regarded scholars and authors of Wabanaki history. They are serving as guest curators for the project.

Click here for more info >

Visit the online exhibit >

 

2012 Waponahki Student Art Show

A collaboration of Maine Indian Education and the Abbe Museum.

The Waponahki Student Art Show brings together a wonderful variety of art created by Passamaquoddy and Penobscot students from early childhood education through high school. Using a wide array of media, these young artists incorporate traditional beliefs and values with the modern, multi-cultural world around them. Visit the online 2012 Waponahki Student Art Show >

Special thanks to K.A. McDonald Custom Picture Framing, Bar Harbor

 

2011 Waponahki Student Art Show

A collaboration of Maine Indian Education and the Abbe Museum.

The Waponahki Student Art Show brings together a wonderful variety of art created by Passamaquoddy and Penobscot students from early childhood education through high school. Using a wide array of media, these young artists incorporate traditional beliefs and values with the modern, multi-cultural world around them.

Special thanks to K.A. McDonald Custom Picture Framing, Bar Harbor.

Visit the online 2011 Waponahki Student Art Show >

Kikehtahsuwiw: It Heals

May 2016 through December 2016

Kikehtahsuwiw is a story about several women in the Passamaquoddy Tribe, residing at both Motahkomikuk (Indian Township) and Sipayik (Pleasant Point). Each of these women shares a common goal: healing their communities. As the carriers of life, they are also carriers of culture and responsible for carrying on their healing traditions. 

 

The Greatest Mountain

2015

A vision by Penobscot artist and historian James Francis

This tribute to Mount Katahdin, through Penobscot histories and accounts of non-Native travelers and writers, uses images, music, stories, and the Penobscot language to bring this sacred mountain to life. Francis used a CNC machine to cut the layers to build the model of Katahdin, which translates from Penobscot to English as “Greatest Mountain.” Images moved and flickered across it, a compilation of  time lapse photographs taken by Francis at night back in November 2014. Along with these time-lapse photographs, there was a song composed by Francis, various other video and still imagery, and spoken word pieces of Penobscot people sharing stories.

 

Coming Home

2015

From baskets to beadwork, woodcarvings to birchbark canoes, tools or artwork, objects are an important expression of Wabanaki culture. Since the arrival of the first European explorers more than 400 years ago, objects made and used by the Wabanaki have made their way into museums around the world. Coming Home featured an exciting and beautiful array of material culture, selected and interpreted by Wabanaki community curators. This exhibit shared cultural and traditional knowledge, revealing a greater depth of information about the Wabanaki objects, and provided a unique opportunity to see these pieces back in the Wabanaki homeland. Learn More >

 

150th Thoreau-Wabanaki Canoe Tour

2014

During May 2014, an epic journey took place commemorating the travels of Henry David Thoreau and his Wabanaki Guide, Joe Polis, in the Maine Woods in July of 1857. This exhibit, created by Chris Sockalexis, Penobscot Nation Tribal Historic Preservation Officer, featured photographs Chris and others took during the trip, giving a glimpse into the beauty and wild nature of the Maine Woods and the Penobscot Nation's homeland. Learn more about the 150th Thoreau-Wabanaki Canoe Tour >

The 150th Anniversary Thoreau-Wabanaki Tour was organized as part of Maine Woods Discovery, a project of the Maine Woods Consortium.

 

2014 Waponahki Student Art Show

A collaboration of Maine Indian Education and the Abbe Museum.

The Waponahki Student Art Show brings together a wonderful variety of art created by Passamaquoddy and Penobscot students from early childhood education through high school. Using a wide array of media, these young artists incorporate traditional beliefs and values with the modern, multi-cultural world around them.

Special thanks to K.A. McDonald Custom Picture Framing, Bar Harbor

 

N'tolonapemk: Our Relatives' Place

2012-2014

Native Americans have lived on Meddybemps Lake at its outlet to the Dennys River for at least 8,600 years. The Passamaquoddy people have named this site N'tolonapemk, which in Passamaquoddy means, "Our Relatives' Place."

This exhibit told the story of N'tolonapemk through archaeological evidence and the stories and knowledge of the Passamaquoddy people. The scientific methods used by archaeologists, contrasted with traditional Passamaquoddy stories, work together to create a more complete picture and a richer understanding of this important place.

A Visit to Our Ancestors' Place >

N'tolonapemk: An Ancient Native American Village on Meddybemps Lake, Maine >

This exhibit was made possible thanks to support from:

Machias Savings Bank

Maine Humanities Council

EASTER Foundation/Anne and Fred Osborn III

 

2013 Waponahki Student Art Show

A collaboration of Maine Indian Education and the Abbe Museum.

The Waponahki Student Art Show brings together a wonderful variety of art created by Passamaquoddy and Penobscot students from early childhood education through high school. Using a wide array of media, these young artists incorporate traditional beliefs and values with the modern, multi-cultural world around them.

Special thanks to K.A. McDonald Custom Picture Framing, Bar Harbor

 

IndiVisible: African-Native American Lives in the Americas

2013

This important and enlightening exhibition, from the Smithsonian Institution, was about the intersection of American Indian and African American people and cultures. IndiVisible: African-Native American Lives in the Americas explored historical and contemporary stories of peoples and communities whose shared histories are woven into the fabric of American identity, but whose presence has long been invisible to many in the U.S. The exhibition shed light on the dynamics of race, community, culture and creativity, and addresses the human desire to belong. With compelling text and powerful graphics, the exhibition included accounts of cultural integration and diffusion as well as the struggle to define and preserve identity. IndiVisible was developed by the National Museum of the American Indian with the National Museum of African American History and Culture, and organized for travel by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service. Learn More >

 

Transcending Traditions: The Next Generation and Maine Indian Basketry

2012

Transcending Traditions featured five contemporary Maine Indian basketmakers representing the next generation: Jeremy Frey, Ganessa Bryant, Sarah Sockbeson, George Neptune, and Eric “Otter” Bacon. This project explored the new directions that these innovative artists are taking the tradition in the face of environmental and economic challenges.

Visit the online catalog for Transcending Traditions >

This exhibit was created as a collaboration between the Maine Indian Basketmakers Alliance and the Hudson Museum, supported by a grant from the National Museum of the American Indian's Indigenous Contemporary Arts Program.

 

Twisted Path II: Contemporary Native American Art Informed by Tradition

2011-2012

An invitational contemporary art show featuring Native artists from the Northeast. Rick Hunt, Abenaki, Guest Curator

Featured Artists: Rhonda Besaw, Abenaki, Beadwork; George Neptune, Passamaquoddy, Basketry; Max Romero, Mi'kmaq & Laguna/Taos Pueblo, Installation; Leon Sockbeson, Passamaquoddy, Couture; Sarah Sockbeson, Penobscot, Painting & Basketry

Learn more about the exhibit and the artists >

Made possible in part by:

The First

and the Fisher Charitable Foundation